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Adventures in Hong Kong

When thinking about “Hong Kong”, what comes to your mind? Is it the noisy and crowded business districts? Or is it the skyscrapers that are tall enough to block out the sun? Many of you may not know, but even though Hong Kong occupies only a small area of about 1000 km-square, almost 40% of these lands are protected as Country Parks. Hidden in this vast space of wilderness, hidden among the countless hills and rolling rivers, are infinite opportunities for exciting adventures.

From leisurely trekking along the sea, to genuine mountain climbing and thrilling river-trekking, we have but one goal: to take you on a journey to safely explore Hong Kong’s wilderness, and show you the fun and wild side of our city. Everyone of our Instructors is born and raised in Hong Kong, and has been roaming this city’s wilderness for a long long time. Over the years, we have stood on top of uncounted numbers of small hills and mountains, climbed over a hundred routes – easy ones and hard ones, and learned all the beautiful little secrets hidden away in every turn of a footpath, and every ban of a river. At the same time, all of our Instructors have received formal training, and are certified by organizations such as the China Hong Kong Mountaineering and Climbing Union and  Hong Kong Rope Union, allowing us to guide you safely through out your adventures.

 

Our Routes

Mountaineering as sport is not about athletes competing with each other; rather, it’s about navigating the Wilderness safely, at a level of difficulties you so choose, and obtain for yourself what you seek from that experience. When it comes to mountaineering, everyone has his or her own level of capabilities, and a personal level of risk that he or she is comfortable with.

Are you looking for a leisurely day-trip to explore the beauty of Hong Kong’s Nature? Or are you seeking an opportunity to test your skills and fitness, against the more severe faces of Hong Kong’s mountains? In the hope of helping every one of you to attain what you look for, we have planned for you hiking tours of three difficulty-levels. However, if you are really after something more than what we are offering, that’s okay! Send us a message and let us tailor-make a trip that is just for you^!

Here, we offer routes of three difficulty levels:
1. Easy——Leisure Hikes;
2. Moderate——Adventurous Challenges;
3. Technical——River Trekking;
Wanting something different? Talk to us and we can customize a route for you!

If you are looking for something more than just the pure joy from a mountain climbing experience, and would like to boost your mountaineering techniques, take a look at our Mountain Climbing and Rope Access courses – may be that’s what you are after!

 (^All the routes listed on this page are for private tours only. To book a tour, you need to have 2-8 participants.)



Leisure Hikes

Some say that, the more difficult a journey, the more beautiful the view along it. True as that may be, in Hong Kong, there are a lot of places that are easily accessible, demanding no special climbing equipment or techniques, but are nonetheless unbelievably stunning, opening in front of you sceneries that you cannot forget.
The key characteristic of the routes listed below is that, none of them requires special climbing techniques. But of course, depending on the conditions and the lengths of the footpaths, some of these routes may still require a certain amount of physical fitness to complete. In any case, all the routes listed under Leisure Hikes are expected to be within the capacity of a normal beginner.


Route 1: The Biggest Reservoir, The Most Beautiful Beach

The MacLehose Trail is one of Hong Kong’s four major hiking trails. This 100-km trail is divided into 10 sections, and it covers most of the major Country Parks of Hong Kong – its start point? In Sai Kung, “Hong Kong’s back garden”.

During this tour, our instructors will take you through the two most fabulous sections of the MacLehose Trail. The first section of Trail is a leisurely hike around the High Island Reservoir – which is the biggest reservoir in Hong Kong. Beside appreciating the surrounding green hills’ reflections on the perfect blue water, we will also walk pass the High Island Geo Trail, which is one of Hong Kong’s Geo Parks, where you can have a good look at the extraordinary hexagonal rock columns along the shore.
After that, the second section of the MacLehose Trail leads you away from the Reservoir, and into three of the most stunning beaches of Hong Kong – Long Ke Wan, Sai Wan (“the West Bay”), and Ham Tin Wan (“the Salty Farm Bay”). Among them, Sai Wan was once elected by a local TV broadcasting company as the most beautiful natural scenery in Hong Kong; its beauty is beyond what words and images can portray – you really have to be there, and see it for yourself.

Route Details
Length: about 24 km
Altitudes (approximate): gain 640 m, and lose 500 m
Duration: about 9 hours

Difficulty Levels (1 = easiest, 5 = hardest)
Climbing Techniques: 1
Physical Fitness: 2.5

Language
Instructors responsible for this route can speak fluent Cantonese, English, and Mandarin.

Meet-up Time and Location
We will meet up at 9:15 a.m., at Sai Kung Bus Terminal; after which we will take public transport together to the start point.
If you wish to start earlier or later, or if you have any question regarding the transportation arrangements, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We can surely work something out together.

Age Requirements
This route is suitable for persons of any age.

Fee
We adjust our fees depending on the size of your group and the technicality of your chosen routes. For details, feel free to write us a message!

Booking
Interested? Write us a message and book a tour now!

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Route 2: A Track Under the Cable Cars

The Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car System was built in 2006, and has since become one of Lantau Island’s most popular tourist attractions. Its route begins in the city centre of Tung Chung, and goes all the way to the Ngong Ping Village that is at the foot of the Big Buddha. When the cable car system was being forged, the Builder has also constructed a hiking trail along its track, for easy transportation of building materials, as well as for emergency usage once the cable cars are up and running. That trail, is what becomes the Ngong Ping Hiking Trail we have today.
Starting at the Tung Chung MTR Station, an easy 20-minute walk will take you away from the busy city, through temples, old village houses and farmlands, to the start point of the trail. When you are climbing over one grassy hill after another along the trail, beside waving to the cable car passengers that occasionally pass overhead, you also get to have a bird-view of the Hong Kong International Airport, as well as getting a good look at the entire Tung Chung New Town. Perhaps more significantly, you get to walk on this beautiful new footpath, and be part of Lantau Island’s beautiful natural landscape.
– After a few hours hike, when you have finally reached the Ngong Ping village, and arrived at the foot of the Big Buddha, do you think you will feel something a little different, from what the other tourists may be feeling, after “sitting” their way up the mountains in buses and cable cars?

Route Details
Length: about 7.5 km
Altitudes (approximate): gain 540 m, and lose 80 m
Duration: about 5 hours

Difficulty Levels (1 = easiest, 5 = hardest)
Climbing Techniques: 1
Physical Fitness: 3

Language
Instructors responsible for this route can speak fluent Cantonese, English, and Mandarin.

Meet-up Time and Location
We will meet up at 9:15 a.m., at the Tung Chung MTR Station.
If you wish to start earlier or later, or if you have any question regarding the transportation arrangements, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We can surely work something out together.

Age Requirements
This route is suitable for persons of any age.

Fee
We adjust our fees depending on the size of your group and the technicality of your chosen routes. For details, feel free to write us a message!

Booking
Interested? Write us a message and book a tour now!

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Route 3: A Climb in the South of the Border

In the immediate south of the border between Hong Kong and Shenzhen, there is a mountain that is 500-meter tall, known as the Robbin’s Nest (or, translated directly from its Chinese name, “the Ridge of Red Flowers”). Part of Hong Kong’s border has been defined by the foot of this very mountain. That rugged and winding trail, which covers the entire length of the mountain’s ridge, can take you all the way from its foot to the top.
When the weather is clear, on your way up, if you look to south, you can see the Pat Sin Leng Mountain Range (“the Mountains of the Eight Immortals”) from afar, under that mountain range, and behind the mangrove forest along the sea shore, are the old villages and farmlands hidden deep in the valleys. And if you turn your head and direct your vision to the north, what you would be seeing directly under the mountain’s foot, is already another city altogether – that’s Shenzhen, Hong Kong’s neighbor of the North.
After passing through the top of the mountain, on your way down, you may also encounter some small bunkers abandoned by history. Many years ago, in these bunkers was where the armies hid during the war. The trail down hill leads you all the way back to the Sha Tau Kok Road – at the terminal of which, you will find a big gate, and yourself that is literally one step away from Mainland China.

Route Details
Length: about 8.8 km
Altitudes (approximate): gain 740 m, and lose 740 m
Duration: about 4 hours

Difficulty Levels (1 = easiest, 5 = hardest)
Climbing Techniques: 1
Physical Fitness: 2

Language
Instructors responsible for this route can speak fluent Cantonese, English, and Mandarin.

Meet-up Time and Location
We will meet up at 9:15 a.m., at the Fanling MTR Station; after which we will take public transport together to the start point.
If you wish to start earlier or later, or if you have any question regarding the transportation arrangements, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We can surely work something out together.

Age Requirements
This route is suitable for persons of any age.

Fee
We adjust our fees depending on the size of your group and the technicality of your chosen routes. For details, feel free to write us a message!

Booking
Interested? Write us a message and book a tour now!

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Adventurous Challenges

If easy trekking can no longer satisfy your desire for adventures; if you want to challenge your physical fitness and your skills, to have a go at those routes less traveled, and experience for yourself the wildly severe side of the beautiful mountains; then, you can find the adventures you are looking for almost anywhere in Hong Kong’s wilderness.
Even though the difficulty levels of the routes listed below are far cry from that of traditional rock climbing routes, given their extreme steepness, and because of the lose rocks and sand along the way, climbers on these routes typically need to use their hands to assist their ascends and descends. In addition, to be able to go up- and down-hill in such craggy terrain, a good sense of balance is also essential.


Route 1: Adventures on the Dog's Teeth

The biggest island in Hong Kong is the Lantau Island, it was named after its highest peak, the Lantau Peak. “Lantau”, in Chinese means a broken head, which describes the shape of this peak – when seeing from afar, it looks like a mountain top that has been hit hard by a hammer, and has its peak broken into two. The Lantau Peak, at 934 meters, is the second highest point of Hong Kong.
Every face of this 900-meter mountain is extremely steep, and even getting to the top via the standard route can take tremendous effort. But if you want to try something even more exciting, a route that is even more rarely traveled, well, there is such a route on the southern face of this mountain. This route begins at the beautiful Shek Pik Reservoir (“the Stone Wall Reservoir”), at mere 60 meter in altitude; from there, the route takes you quickly up one of the mountain’s ridges, and leads you all the way to the 900-meter peak. The ridge that this route covers is known as “the Ridge of the Dog’s Teeth” among local climbers. It is so named because it is jagged with one steep hill after another, each one taller than the one before, each one steeper than the one the climber has just passed. From its name alone, you can probably imagine the severity of this sinister route. But if you are up for the challenge, then you get to experience how it feels like, when the road ahead is almost vertical, and the slopes on both sides of where you are standing are cliffs that are yet steeper.

Route Details
Length: about 7.3 km
Altitudes (approximate): gain 1000 m, and lose 380 m
Duration: about 6 hours

Difficulty Levels (1 = easiest, 5 = hardest)
Climbing Techniques: 3
Physical Fitness: 4.5

Language
Instructors responsible for this route can speak fluent Cantonese, English, and Mandarin.

Meet-up Time and Location
We will meet up at 9:00 a.m., at the Tung Chung MTR Station; after which we will take public transport together to the start point.
If you wish to start earlier or later, or if you have any question regarding the transportation arrangements, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We can surely work something out together.

Age Requirements
Participants must be 12 years or older.

Fee
We adjust our fees depending on the size of your group and the technicality of your chosen routes. For details, feel free to write us a message!

Booking
Interested? Write us a message and book a tour now!

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Route 2: The Cliffs of Kowloon Peak

Now you may have heard that, on the Kowloon Peninsular of Hong Kong, there is a Lion Rock Hill, which separates the city of Kowloon in the south, and the town of Shatin in the north. Because the Lion Rock Hill stands at the heart of Hong Kong’s urban area, its name has been seen repeatedly in local pop culture, and is therefore known by many. What you may not know is that, to the east of this hill, there is a mountain much taller, and whose faces look equally-severe. That is the Kowloon Peak (or, as the locals call it, the “Mountain of Moth”). It is the range of this mountain, that separates the densely built urban city of Kowloon, and the green hills and blue seas in the beautiful Sai Kung, “Hong Kong’s Back Garden”.
Looking up from the foot of Kowloon Peak’s south-western face, one can already see one cliff after another covering the major part of this face. Almost every one of these cliffs has its own name, and are attempted only by the most experienced rock climbers. However, immediately to the side of these cliffs, there is a footpath, zigzaging all the way up. Determined climbers can start at the side of the road, and follow this footpath that is sometimes extremely steep and sometimes almost vertical, to hike along one of the craggy ridges of Kowloon Peak to its very top. Along the way, beside appreciating the stunning cliffs next to you, you also get to look down from the top of these cliffs, from where you will notice that the entire area that is north of the Victoria Harbour and south of the Lion Rock Hill, is all under you feet. When you are staring from the top of a cliff, and find out that directly under you are houses and buildings that now look more like blocks of Lego, would your definition of “wilderness”, and your perception of “Hong Kong”, have changed, even just a little bit?

Route Details
Length: about 5.5 km
Altitudes (approximate): gain 520 m, and lose 580 m
Duration: about 5 hours

Difficulty Levels (1 = easiest, 5 = hardest)
Climbing Techniques: 3
Physical Fitness: 3

Language
Instructors responsible for this route can speak fluent Cantonese, English, and Mandarin.

Meet-up Time and Location
We will meet up at 9:15 a.m., at the Choi Hung MTR Station; after which we will take public transport together to the start point.
If you wish to start earlier or later, or if you have any question regarding the transportation arrangements, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We can surely work something out together.

Age Requirements
Participants must be 12 years or older.

Fee
We adjust our fees depending on the size of your group and the technicality of your chosen routes. For details, feel free to write us a message!

Booking
Interested? Write us a message and book a tour now!

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Route 3: A Ride on the Saddle

Looking up from the sea of Sai Kung, you will see a tall mountain of a peculiar shape. This mountain, which is tall enough to obscure your vision to almost the entire Hong Kong behind it, has two peaks, linked by a long U-shaped ridge, making it look like a saddle on a horse. People call it “Ma On Shan“, which literally means “Mt. Saddle”.
The highest point of Ma On Shan is more than 700 meters tall, making it the tallest peak in Sai Kung. Because this peak is surrounded by steep faces from all sides, as of today, there no easy way up the mountain. To get to the top, one route you can take is to start at the train station that is pretty much at sea level, and follow an ordinary-looking road, to reach an ordinary-looking barbecue site at about 200 meters in altitude. Hidden behind this babecue site is a craggy footpath, which can take a climber that is brave enough up to one of Ma On Shan’s stunning ridges, and after climbing up and down one hill after another, the climber will finally arrive at the 700-meter peak of Ma On Shan – from where, when the weather is fine, you can see almost the entire 1000-km-square of Hong Kong all around you.
After getting down the mountain, you can follow the MacLehose Trail, with the beautiful sea of Sai Kung in your eyes, and take a leisure stroll towards Sai Kung’s city centre.

Route Details
Length: about 10.3 km
Altitudes (approximate): gain 820 m, and lose 820 m
Duration: about 6 hours

Difficulty Levels (1 = easiest, 5 = hardest)
Climbing Techniques: 3
Physical Fitness: 4

Language
Instructors responsible for this route can speak fluent Cantonese, English, and Mandarin.

Meet-up Time and Location
We will meet up at 9:15 a.m., at the Ma On Shan MTR Station.
If you wish to start earlier or later, or if you have any question regarding the transportation arrangements, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We can surely work something out together.

Age Requirements
Participants must be 12 years or older.

Fee
We adjust our fees depending on the size of your group and the technicality of your chosen routes. For details, feel free to write us a message!

Booking
Interested? Write us a message and book a tour now!

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River Trekking

To get to special places, one needs a special set of skills. On the hundreds of hills and mountains in Hong Kong, flow the thousands of streams and rivers along their gorges and gullies. Hidden among them, are the chilling water from the brooks, the rushing sounds made by fabulous waterfalls, the steep and fearsome walls marking the edges of valleys, and the huge boulders of all kinds of peculiar shapes. To safely trek along a river, from its mouth near the sea, all the way to where it begins up in the mountains, you will need to possess a certain level of climbing skills.
To complete the routes listed below, one doesn’t have to be a skillful rock climber; however, the difficulties of some parts of these routes can still hold a candle to the easiest traditional climbing routes. At the spots that are particularly difficult, or ones that are especially exposed, our instructors will fix ropes to belay you, to ensure your safety.


Route 1: Beaches, Waterfalls, and Cliffs

Due to severe weathering over a period of many years, the hill tops of the mountain range in Hong Kong’s north-western area are often bald of vegetation, and are covered instead by white sand and lose rocks. When it rains, these pale sediments will be washed into the streams, and deposited along the gentle banks close to the river’s mouth. For a very few number of rivers in Hong Kong, the sediments have built up over the years, and formed small beaches along the river shore – in the north of Tuen Mun near the border, there is a Tsing Tai River (“the Big Green River”), which happens to be one of these special rivers.
A trekker can start at the river mouth, stepping into the chilled stream water and the fine white sediments, heading towards the source of the river in the mountains (*Note: depending on the water level, participants may need to walk into the river, with water that is knee-deep at its highest). After passing an abandoned dam, the trekker will leave behind the beaches of the river’s lower section, and start climbing up its steeper upper section. By clambering one waterfall after another, the trekker will finally arrive at a valley floor that is surrounded by jagged hills and mountains on all sides. The trekker can then leave the river, and follow a trail up the rugged mountain terrain. After going pass a peculiar landscape feature that the locals call “the Mini Canyon”, the trekker will arrive at a small village in the north-western side of Hong Kong, known, appropriately, as Ha Pak Nai Village (“the Lower Village with White Sand”). Beside giving you a feel of Hong Kong’s village life, this village also happens to be one of the best spots in our city to watch the sun set.

Route Details
Length: river – about 2.4 km; total – about 7.6 km
Altitudes (approximate): gain 340 m, and lose 340 m
Duration: about 5 hours

Difficulty Levels (1 = easiest, 5 = hardest)
Climbing Techniques: 4.5
Physical Fitness: 3.5

Language
Instructors responsible for this route can speak fluent Cantonese, English, and Mandarin.

Meet-up Time and Location
We will meet up at 9:15 a.m., at the Yuen Long MTR Station; after which we will take public transport together to the start point.
If you wish to start earlier or later, or if you have any question regarding the transportation arrangements, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We can surely work something out together.

Age Requirements
Participants must be 16 years or older.

Fee
We adjust our fees depending on the size of your group and the technicality of your chosen routes. For details, feel free to write us a message!

Booking
Interested? Write us a message and book a tour now!

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Route 2: The Dragon Ball at the Feet of the Eight Immortals

In the north-eastern side of Hong Kong, there is a huge reservoir, on the side of this reservoir, there stands a mountain range that looks almost like a gigantic screen. On the top of this mountain range are eight small peaks, and because of them, people call this mountain “Pat Sin Leng” (“the Mountain of the Eight Immortals”). Pat Sin Leng is a popular destination for many local hikers, and the story of the eight Immortals is also quite well know. Little do these people know, however, is that hidden somewhere in this mountain, there is a beautiful “Dragon Ball Waterfall”. On the north face of Pat Sin Leng, there flows a river scattered with strange boulders, which carries the pure stream water from the top of the mountain all the way into the big reservoir at its side. The river passes through a series of cliffs, forming one stunning waterfall after another.
Unsuspecting trekkers can find the ordinary-looking entrance to the river, somewhere along the bank of the reservoir. Almost immediately after entering this river, you will see huge boulders of bizarre shapes everywhere. And while you climb up the river, you will notice that the cliffs you need to scale are getting steeper and steeper, and the waterfalls on which are also getting prettier and prettier – until, finally, you find yourself at the foot of a waterfall that is almost 30 meters high, and that, is how you’ll know, that you have found the mysterious Dragon Ball Waterfall. After ascending this big waterfall, the river at last starts to ease off. It takes you all the way into the mountain range, and leaves you somewhere on a popular country trail. On that trail, you are probably going to encounter some eager hikers coming to see the Pat Sin Leng – and guess, how many of them have ever seen what you have just saw?

Route Details
Length: river – about 2.3 km; total – about 4 km
Altitudes (approximate): gain 320 m, and lose 320 m
Duration: about 5 hours

Difficulty Levels (1 = easiest, 5 = hardest)
Climbing Techniques: 4.5
Physical Fitness: 3.5

Language
Instructors responsible for this route can speak fluent Cantonese, English, and Mandarin.

Meet-up Time and Location
We will meet up at 8:45 a.m., at the Tai Po Market MTR Station; after which we will take public transport together to the start point.
If you wish to start earlier or later, or if you have any question regarding the transportation arrangements, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We can surely work something out together.

Age Requirements
Participants must be 16 years or older.

Fee
We adjust our fees depending on the size of your group and the technicality of your chosen routes. For details, feel free to write us a message!

Booking
Interested? Write us a message and book a tour now!

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Route 3: The Bizarre Rocks and Waterfalls under Ma On Shan

If a climber wants to walk from the town of Shatin to “Hong Kong’s Back Garden” Sai Kung, he or she will have to scale the big mountain standing directly in his or her way, the Ma On Shan. To do that, for many leisure hikers, just a two-to-three-hour walk along an easy country trail will already satisfy them. However, if you are looking for something special, if you want to experience the exciting side of Hong Kong’s wilderness, one option for you would be to trek a river up the mountain instead, a river that is filled with bizarre boulders.
The entrance of the river is located next to some residential buildings, which looks unassuming enough. However, as soon as you get into the river-proper, you will find yourself surrounded by huge boulders, often of the size of small houses, and peculiar walls along the banks, which are sometimes as smooth as silk, and sometimes as rugged as the hands of a very old climber. And occasionally, along this winding river, on some of these strange rocks and walls, you will get to see some splendid waterfalls and pools of chilling water.
When you exit the river, you are already half-way up Ma On Shan. From there, you can relax, enjoy the view, and have a nice and leisurely stroll to Sai Kung.

Route Details
Length: river – about 2 km; total – about 7.4 km
Altitudes (approximate): gain 440 m, and lose 440 m
Duration: about 5 hours

Difficulty Levels (1 = easiest, 5 = hardest)
Climbing Techniques: 3.5
Physical Fitness: 2

Language
Instructors responsible for this route can speak fluent Cantonese, English, and Mandarin.

Meet-up Time and Location
We will meet up at 9:15 a.m., at the Tai Shui Hang MTR Station.
If you wish to start earlier or later, or if you have any question regarding the transportation arrangements, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We can surely work something out together.

Age Requirements
Participants must be 16 years or older.

Fee
We adjust our fees depending on the size of your group and the technicality of your chosen routes. For details, feel free to write us a message!

Booking
Interested? Write us a message and book a tour now!

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Notes to Participants

Before leaving us a message, please read through the following notes carefully.

Please comply with the 7 Leave No Trace Principles
Having an adventure in the wild, and savoring the beautiful scenery along the way is a joyful thing to do. However, when you take part in these activities, please also help us protect Hong Kong’s countryside, and follow the Leave No Trace principles. These principles include:

  • Please take away with you all the rubbish produced during the activity (including used cans), and dispose of them only after you are back to the urban area; please do not throw them into the rubbish bins located inside the country parks.
  • Please respect the wildlife, and avoid hurting or disturbing the plants, insects, and animals.
  • Please respect other visitors, don’t yell, and please give way to others when is appropriate.
  • Please do not lit a fire in any place other than a designated barbecue site or campsite.
  • Please do not pollute the water source.

What do I bring with me for the tour?
Bringing with you the right gears can ensure not just the smoothness of your journey, but also your safety. We will provide you with professional climbing gears (such as climbing ropes and fist aid kit) when needed, but before meeting up, please also prepare for yourself a few personal items. Our instructors will check to make sure that every participant has the listed gears with him or her. We reserve the rights to reject any participant without enough gears to take part in our tours, and the fee paid by that participant will not be refunded.

How much time should I spare for these tours?
The time required is different for each route. We have already specified the expected duration for each tour in its description. In general, for day-trips, we expect to complete them between 09:00am to 06:00pm. However, the actual time needed to complete a route will depend on factors such as weather, participants’ physical conditions, and the conditions of the trails. Participants are advised to spare an extra one to two hours “just in case”, so that if we are delayed during the tour, you wouldn’t need to rush down the mountains afterwards.

What does the booking fee include?
The fee listed on this website, will be used only to hire instructors, and to acquire the “Certificate of Completion” issued by the China Hong Kong Mountaineering and Climbing Union.
The fee does not include the transportation needed before/after/during the tour; neither does the fee include any food and drinks for the participants during the tour; if needed, participants can purchase insurance for themselves.

Who can participate?
【1】Quotas: As all the tours are private ones, for every tour, there needs to be at least 2 participants; the number of participants for each tour should not be over 8.
【2】Children: Taking your kids out and let them experience the nature is a lot of fun. Any participant under the age of 18 needs to be accompanied by at least one responsible adult throughout the tour. In addition, as some of our routes are more technical, to ensure the safety of every participant, we have set the age requirements for some of the routes:

  • Leisure Hikes: Suitable for persons of any age
  • Adventures Challenges: Participants need to be 12 years or older
  • River Trekking: Participants need to be 16 or older

How should I interpret the “difficulty levels” in the routes’ descriptions?
To give you a better sense of the routes before picking them, we have visited these routes for multiple times, and determined their difficulty levels. For each route, we have noted its demand on a climber’s physical fitness, as well as a climber’s climbing techniques . Each route is given a score from 1 to 5, along these two dimensions, with 1 being the least demanding, and 5 being the most demanding.
In terms of physical fitness, a score of 1 means that the major part of the route is along gentle slope, without steep climbs, and the trail is also well-paved. Whereas a score of 5 means that the route is longer than 20 km, and requires climbing up and down steep slopes; trail surfaces may also be uneven, requiring more physical efforts to walk on.
In terms of climbing techniques, a score of 1 means that the trail is well-paved, and even a climber may need to walk up and down the slopes, one doesn’t need to use the hands to keep one’s balance. Whereas a score of 5 means that hands are needed to assist the climb throughout most of the route, and certain sections of the route may be extremely steep or even vertical – although the difficulty levels of these routes are still lower than that of ordinary rock climbing routes.

What to do in case of bad weather?
If the Hong Kong Observatory has hoisted a typhoon signal no. 3 or above, or a storm warning signal of any color (yellow, red, or green), 3 hours before the meet-up time of the tour, the tour will be canceled. If these signals are issued during the tour, the instructors-on-site will terminate the activity immediately, and take the participants down the mountain via the quickest route.

In addition, please note that the risks associated with different routes are different – for some of these routes, one can climb safely under light rain; for others, even a drizzle can cause grave danger to the participants and the instructors. Therefore, besides making references to the warning signals issued by the Hong Kong Observatory, the instructors-on-site will also judge for themselves whether a tour needs to be canceled, or terminated prematurely.

If a tour is canceled due to bad weather, participants can choose to:
【1】Request a full refund – since we receive your payment via PayPal, who charges about 3% of commission fee for each transaction, the 3% commission fee paid to PayPal will not be refundable. Other than that, we can refund you with the rest of the fee.
【2】Reschedule the same tour with us for another date.

If a tour has already started, and needs to be terminated prematurely due to bad weather, no fee will be refunded. Please accept our apology.

Who is responsible for my personal safety?
All the instructors responsible for the tours have received formal training, and have the capability to guide the participants through all the routes listed on this webpage. During the tour, when needed, our instructors will also remind our participants about certain safety issues, or provide them with climbing assistance and belay, to make sure that, after enjoying all the excitements of exploring the wild, everyone can get down from the mountains safely.
However, please realize that mountain climbing itself is a risky activity. Accidents can still happen even when we have taken all the necessary precautions. By signing up and booking a tour on this website, you are declaring that you, and all the participants indicated on the sign up form, understand that the activity involves certain risks, and you declare that you are all physically fit for this activity. You are agreeing that the Hong Kong Wilderness Training Centre, or any other individual directly or indirectly related to this tour, shall have no responsibility or liability with respect to any accident, death, or loss of any kind, that happens to any of you during the program, or as a result of you participating in the program. You are also agreeing that, during the program, if any participant violates any safety-related rules set by the instructors, the Hong Kong Training Centre has the right to terminate his or her participation in the program, and his or her participation fee will not be refunded.

Privacy Policy Statement and Disclaimer

Disclaimer

Information provided on Hong Kong Wilderness Training Centre’s website (This Website) should only be treated as general information, and for references only. This Website has tried its best to ensure that the accuracy of its contents. This Website will not be responsible for any information on it that is wrong, missed, or untrue. This Website will not be responsible for direct or indirect loss caused by your usage, or inability to use, This Website. You have the responsibility to verify all the information uploaded to This Website, and consult independent opinion before acting up this information.

Privacy Policy

This Privacy Policy has been developed in accordance with the Personal Data (Privacy) Ordinance (Chapter 486) of the Laws of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of The People’s Republic of China. The Ordinance provides data subjects with rights to ascertain whether the Hong Kong Wilderness Training Centre holds personal data relating to them, to obtain a copy of that data, and to correct any data that is inaccurate.

Site visitors can freely explore this Website largely without having to reveal any personal data. On occasion however, it may be necessary for the Hong Kong Wilderness Training Centre to gather information on you for a specific purpose. We will always inform you when we are collecting such information. It is our intention to respect your request for privacy, and we try our best to provide you with communication channels to facilitate this. Once all gathered information has been used for the intended purpose, it is destroyed or de-identified.

The Hong Kong Wilderness Training Centre has created this statement in order to demonstrate its firm commitment to protecting your privacy. The following discloses our information gathering methods and dissemination practices for this Website. The Hong Kong Wilderness Training Centre is not responsible for the privacy practices of other linked sites.

Cookies

We do automatically receive and record information from the computer and browser of people visit this Website, including your IP address, for traffic analysis and site-management. In addition, this Website also uses cookies. Cookies are commonly used to facilitate transmission and to provide more useful features. It is a piece of data stored in your computer. You are not identified. However if you agree by filling out relevant forms on this Website, we may link the information to you, so that you may receive information more suited to your interests, and request services, sign up for activities, and send out messages to specific websites more easily.

You may set your browser to reject cookies, or tell you when a cookie is being sent.

The Protection and Sharing of Personal Information

We will automatically receive and record information from the computer and browser of people visiting this Site, including your IP address, domain, and the pages you request for traffic analysis and generation of aggregated statistics reports

Information collected will be used solely for the purposes stated above. We do not share any personal data about you with other companies or organizations without your prior consent. However, information may be disclosed incidental to or in the course of our operation to the following parties:

1. the person to whom we are required to make disclosure under any law applicable in or outside Hong Kong;
2. the person specified in the forms you have filled in, to whom you have chosen to share your information.

Data Security

The Hong Kong Wilderness Training Centre will take reasonable steps to ensure that all information we collect, use or disclose is accurate, complete, up-to-date and stored in a secure environment accessed only by authorized persons. However, we give no warranty against third parties hacking into the data or any unauthorised access to the data by anyone.

“Opt-Out”

You can opt-out from receiving information from the Hong Kong Wilderness Training Centre or to delete your information from our records at any time. To opt out, please contact this Website’s administrator via webmaster@hkwtc.com.hk

Contacting the Website

Should you have further questions regarding this Privacy Policy, the practices of this Website and your interaction with it, or to request access and correction to your personal data, please contact:

Hong Kong Wilderness Training Centre: admin@hkwtc.com.hk

Personal Information Collection Statement

This Website may from time to time collect your personal data specific for the purpose of event or activities organized or promoted by it (“Event”).

Purposes for which personal data are collected and used

The Hong Kong Wilderness Training Centre may use the data collected and provided by you for one or more of the following purposes:

1. To contact you in response to your request(s);
2. For identification and verification purposes;
3. For our own internal records, research and statistical purposes; and
4. For any other purpose pertaining to the Event.

You are not required to provide the data. However, if you select not to supply the data as requested, your entry form or application form (as the case may be) will not be counted or processed or be eligible for the associated activities.

Data Security

The data you provide to us will be stored at our Office or our server in Hong Kong accessible only to our authorised employees and contractors. However, we give no warranty against third parties hacking into the data or any unauthorised access to the data by anyone.

This Website will take reasonable steps to ensure that all information we collect, use or disclose is accurate, complete and up-to-date.

Retention of Data

We will take reasonable steps to ensure that all information we collect, use or disclose is accurate, complete and up-to-date.

Your Consent

By submitting the requisite entry form/ application form, you certify that all information provided to the Hong Kong Wilderness Training Centre in the form is true and correct. You agree that your personal data given to and collected by the Hong Kong Wilderness Training Centre from time to time may be used and disclosed for the foregoing purposes, and to such persons as may be appropriate in accordance with this Personal Information Collection Statement and Privacy Policy of this Website.

Please also refer to our Privacy Policy.

This Personal Information Collection Statement and our Privacy Policy are subject to change without prior or separate notification. Any changes will be posted to our Website.

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